Systematic Theology

“Systematic” refers to something being put into a system. Systematic theology is, therefore, the division of theology into systems that explain its various areas. For example, many books of the Bible give information about the angels. No one book gives all the information about the angels. Systematic theology takes all the information about angels from all the books of the Bible and organizes it into a system called angelology. That is what systematic theology is all about—organizing the teachings of the Bible into categorical systems.1


Angelology

Angelology is the study of angels. There are many unbiblical views of angels today. Some believe angels are human beings who have died. Others believe that angels are impersonal sources of power. Still others deny the existence of angels entirely. A biblical understanding of angelology will correct these false beliefs. Angelology tells us what the Bible says about angels. It is a study of how the angels relate to humanity and serve God’s purposes.2


Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of humanity. Christian Anthropology is the study of humanity from a Christian / biblical perspective. It is primarily focused on the nature of humanity – how the immaterial and material aspects of man relate to each other.3


Bibliology

Bibliology is the study of the Bible, the Word of God. The Bible is the inspired source of knowledge about God, Jesus Christ, salvation, and eternity. Without a proper view of the Bible, our views on these and other issues become clouded and distorted. Bibliology tells us what the Bible is.4


Christology

The word “Christology” comes from two Greek words meaning “Christ / Messiah” and “word” – which combine to mean “the study of Christ.” Christology is the study of the Person and work of Jesus Christ.5


Covenants

The Idea of Covenant. The term “covenant” is of Latin origin (con venire), meaning a coming together. It presupposes two or more parties who come together to make a contract, agreeing on promises, stipulations, privileges, and responsibilities. In religious and theological circles there has not been agreement on precisely what is to be understood by the biblical term. It is used variously in biblical contexts. In political situations, it can be translated treaty; in a social setting, it means a lifelong friendship agreement; or it can refer to a marriage.6


Ecclesiology

Ecclesiology is the study of the church. The word Ecclesiology comes from two Greek words meaning “assembly” and “word” – combining to mean “the study of the church.” The church is the assembly of believers who belong to God. Ecclesiology is crucial to understand God’s purpose for believers in the world today.7


Eschatology

Eschatology is the study of what the Bible says is going to happen in the end times. Many treat Eschatology as an area of theology to be avoided. Of course, Eschatology is not as crucial as Christology or Soteriology. That does not mean, though, that it is unimportant to a Biblical worldview. How we understand Eschatology has an impact on how we should live our lives and what we are to expect to occur in God’s plan.8


Hamartiology

Hamartiology is the study of sin. Hamartiology deals with how sin originated, how it affects humanity, and what it will result in after death. To sin essentially means to “miss the mark.” We all miss God’s mark of righteousness (Romans 3:23). Hamartiology, then, explains why we miss the mark, how we miss the mark, and the consequences of missing the mark.9


Hell

The Bible clearly and explicitly teaches that hell is a real place to which the wicked/unbelieving are sent after death. We have all sinned against God (Romans 3:23). The just punishment for that sin is death (Romans 6:23). Since all of our sin is ultimately against God (Psalm 51:4), and since God is an infinite and eternal Being, the punishment for sin, death, must also be infinite and eternal. Hell is this infinite and eternal death which we have earned because of our sin.10


Hermeneutics

Biblical hermeneutics is the study of the principles and methods of interpreting the text of the Bible. Second Timothy 2:15 commands believers to be involved in hermeneutics: “Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who . . . correctly handles the word of truth.” The purpose of biblical hermeneutics is to help us to know how to properly interpret, understand, and apply the Bible.11


Law

The word is properly used, in Scripture as elsewhere, to express a definite commandment laid down by any recognized authority; but when the word is used with the article, and without any words of limitation, it refers to the expressed will to God, and in nine cases out of ten to the Mosaic law, or to the Pentateuch of which it forms the chief portion. The Hebrew word torah (law) lays more stress on its moral authority, as teaching the truth and guiding in the right way; the Greek nomos (law), on its constraining power as imposed and enforced by a recognized authority.12


Pneumatology

The word Pneumatology comes from two Greek words which mean “wind, air, spirit” and “word” – combining to mean “the study of the Holy Spirit.” Pneumatology is the study of God the Holy Spirit, the third Person of the Trinity.13


Soteriology

Soteriology is the study of the doctrine of salvation. Soteriology discusses how Christ’s death secures the salvation of those who believe. It helps us to understand the doctrines of redemption, justification, sanctification, propitiation, and the substitutionary atonement.14


Theology Proper

Theology proper is the study of God and His attributes. Theology proper focuses on God the Father. Paterology comes from two Greek words which mean “father” and “word” – which combine to mean “the study of the Father.”15


Citations

1. https://www.gotquestions.org/systematic-theology.html
2. https://www.gotquestions.org/Angelology.html
3. https://www.gotquestions.org/Christian-Anthropology.html
4. https://www.gotquestions.org/Bibliology.html
5. https://www.gotquestions.org/Christology.html

6. https://www.biblestudytools.com/dictionary/covenant/
7. https://www.gotquestions.org/Ecclesiology.html
8. https://www.gotquestions.org/Eschatology.html
9. https://www.gotquestions.org/Hamartiology.html
10. https://www.gotquestions.org/hell-real-eternal.html
11. https://www.gotquestions.org/Biblical-hermeneutics.html
12. https://biblehub.com/topical/l/law.htm
13. https://www.gotquestions.org/Pneumatology.html
14. https://www.gotquestions.org/Soteriology.html
15. https://www.gotquestions.org/theology-proper.html
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